Fishery Management Group


FMG group photo
June 2006


David Die
Our fearless leader: David Die

My main research interest is the development of mathematical and statistical models (both for simulation and estimation) to support natural resource management. My research is therefore geared towards giving scientifically-based resource management advice and help quantitative auditing of management performance. I have a special interest in developing an understanding of the mechanisms that are key to the sustainability of fisheries. I have worked for 12 years on research devoted to the assessment and management of tropical fisheries worldwide (Oceania, Asia, Latin America and Africa) and my research was instrumental in the development of major management changes (fishing closures, fleet capacity reductions) in several fisheries. Presently, I am doing work in the assessment of tuna and reef-fish fisheries in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. I have current collaborative research links with scientists in the main fishery Institutions in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Oceania.


University of Miami
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, FL 33149
Telephone: (305) 421.4607
Fax: (305) 361-4457
E-mail: ddie@rsmas.miami.edu


Aric Bickell    Aric Bickell

is a city in Hungary. He is the administrative center of the Vas county in the west of the country, located near the border with Austria. (Okay, he's not really, but Aric hasn't written his bio yet.)

Ayeisha Brinson Ayeisha Brinson

I received a B.S from the University of Florida in 2000. I later went on to pursue a M.S from Colorado State University (2002) and work for the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center (2000-2002). I entered the Interdepartmental Ph.D program at the University of Miami in the Fall of 2003. I am interested in the dynamics between people and natural resources. My research seeks to develop a methodology to determine socioeconomic indicators that can be used in conjunction with biological indicators for the evaluation of the effects of billfish management strategies. I am also a McKnight Doctoral Fellow and a fellowship recipient of the LMRCSC.


Ayeisha Brinson
University of Miami
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida, 33149
Phone: (305) 421-4149
Fax: (305) 361-4457
E-mail: abrinson@rsmas.miami.edu


Anthony DiSilvestro

I was born and raised in Park Ridge, Illinois where I spent most of my childhood pursuing my passions of Ice Hockey and Marine Science. I took a high school marine biology class from the Shedd Aquarium my senior year of high school and decided to pursue a career in marine science over hockey. This led me to the University of Miami where I earned my B.A. in Marine Affairs (2005). I am currently pursuing an M.A. in Marine Affairs/Policy at RSMAS along with being the RSMAS Program Coordinator of the South Florida Student Shark Program. My main interests are in commercial shark fisheries management and commercial shrimp fisheries bycatch reduction methods.

Anthony DiSilvestro
University of Miami
Marine Affairs and Policy
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida, 33149
E-mail: adisilvestro@rsmas.miami.edu


Katie Drew

I was born and raised in Chicago. In search of warmer weather, I went first to Claremont, CA, where I got my bachelor of science degree from Harvey Mudd College in biology in 2002. I then moved to Miami, to enter the PhD program at RSMAS the same year. I am interested in the population dynamics of white marlin. Currently I am working on developing an age and growth model for this species. I also work part-time as a naturalist at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Biscayne Nature Center, which specializes in environmental education for local school children.

Katie Drew
University of Miami
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida, 33149
Phone: (305) 421-4924
Fax: (305) 361-4457
E-mail: kdrew@rsmas.miami.edu

Dwight Ebanks Dwight Ebanks

After graduating from Savannah State University (SSU) with a BS in Marine Biology, I was commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Navy. Following the completion of my naval service, I returned to the U.S. and began work on a MS in Marine Science. My research during a two year matriculation to SSU focused on the influence of physical factors and ray bioturbation on meiofaunal abundance. Currently, I am a research assistant with the LMRCSC focusing my research on how rays being caught as bycatch affects ray population abundance and geographic distribution along the southeastern United States.

Dwight Ebanks
Research Assistant
University of Miami
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida, 33149
Phone: (305) 421-4872
E-mail: debanks@rsmas.miami.edu

Neil Hammerschlag Neil Hammerschlag

I am currently pursuing a doctorate degree at RSMAS. My research focuses on understanding the ecological roles of marine predators, particularly sharks, as well as on the community ecology of mangrove fishes. I have an undergraduate degree in Ecology from the University of Toronto, Canada and received my Masters degree in Marine Biology from the Nova Southeastern University, Oceanographic Center. I am also currently directing the South Florida Student Shark Program (SFSSP) with students participating from South Broward High School (Broward, Florida), MAST Academy High School (Miami, Florida) and the University of Miami (Miami, Florida).
Website: www.neil4sharks.org

Neil Hammerschlag
University of Miami
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida, 33149
Phone: (305) 421-4356
Fax: (305) 421-4600
Cell: (954) 815-0920
E-mail: nhammerschlag@rsmas.miami.edu

Kristin Kleisner Kristin Kleisner

Prior to beginning the PhD program in fisheries at RSMAS in 2002, I attended Portland State University in Portland, OR. While there, I received a B.S. in Environmental Studies and a B.S. in Biology with a focus in marine studies. I was also very interested in Asian cultures and received a minor in Asian History and Culture. I graduated in 2000, and moved to Jackson Hole, WY to cultivate my love of the mountains and snowboarding before returning to the academic world. Currently, my research focuses on the determination of dolphinfish abundance using various linear and additive models. Additionally I am examining the effect of incorporating spatial autocorrelation into indices of abundance as a means to improve estimates. I use satellite derived environmental data and GIS systems to better understand the habitat needs of this species in order to enhance stock assessments.

Kristin Kleisner
University of Miami
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida, 33149
Phone: (305) 421-4924
Fax: (305) 361-4457
E-mail: kkleisner@rsmas.miami.edu

Veronique Koch Véronique Koch

My love for the ocean began when I was very young, studying animals in tide pools on the beaches of Belgium, and snorkeling with stingrays while on family vacation. I decided to become a marine biologist in junior high school. Not living by the ocean didnít stop me (I lived first in Toronto, Canada, then in Luxembourg!) and I obtained my bachelorís degree with honors in marine biology from the University of Stirling, Scotland. I started doing summer work while I was in college, from volunteering for NOAA in Key Largo (working in the underwater habitat, the Aquarius, while helping visiting scientists!) to tracking harbor seals in Santa Cruz, California, to tagging lemon sharks in Bimini. These great experiences eventually led to getting a job at NOAA in Miami. I am currently working at NOAA Fisheries Southeast Fisheries Science Center, who is funding my Ph.D. RSMAS. I am interested in ecology, particularly delineating essential fish habitat and migration patterns, and reproductive biology and behavior. My current work utilizes acoustic telemetry to tag and track black groupers (Mycteroperca bonaci) in the Florida Keys to understand where they move to, when, and why, and what kind of habitat is important for the survival of this highly sought-after species.

Véronique Koch
NOAA Fisheries
75 Virginia Beach Drive
Miami FL 33149
Phone: (305) 361-4483
E-mail: veronique.koch@noaa.gov

Steven Saul Steven Saul

I have a bachelor of science in environmental science and music from the University of Richmond, and a masters of arts in marine affairs and policy from RSMAS. During my undergraduate career, I worked with various not-for-profit environmental and marine science-related organizations, including the Natural Resource Defense Council, Reef Environmental Education Foundation, and Living Oceans (now Blue Ocean Institute). During the completion of his masterís degree, I worked on analysis of the cultural, political and biological state of the yellowtail snapper and Caribbean spiny lobster fisheries in the U.S. Caribbean. Currently, I am a graduate assistant with the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and am pursuing a PhD in marine biology and fisheries at the RSMAS. With NMFS, I have served on three stock assessment panels as part of their Southeast Data Assessment and Review (SEDAR) process.

Steven Saul
NOAA Fisheries
75 Virginia Beach Drive
Miami FL 33149
Phone: (305) 361-4110
E-mail: steven.saul@noaa.gov

Xaymara M. Serrano-Vicente Xaymara M. Serrano-Vicente

Currently, I am a graduate student at RSMAS pursuing a masterís degree in Marine Biology. At RSMAS, I am funded by the Living Marine Resource Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC). I am originally from Puerto Rico, where I completed my Bachelorís degree in Biology at the University of Puerto Rico (2004). My thesis research here at RSMAS will allow me to determine the salinity history and preference of the coral reef fish gray snapper; a nursery species abundant in South Florida. My primary career and short-term goal right now is to complete a PhD degree in Marine Biology. Completing an advanced degree in marine biology is the first step in being able to become a significant contributor to addressing the science challenges of the next decade with the added challenge of passing some of that knowledge to my own culture.

Xaymara M. Serrano-Vicente
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida, 33149
Phone: (305) 421-4149
E-mail: xserrano@rsmas.miami.edu

Manoj Shivlani Manoj Shivlani

I was born in Bombay (now Mumbai), India, and grew up in Lagos and then Jos, Nigeria, before moving to suburban London, UK, to finish high school, and then to Lima, Peru. From there, it was off to upstate New York for three and a half years to get a bachelorís degree in biology from Colgate University. After internships observing humpback whale behavior off Gloucester, Massachusetts, and teaching environmental education in Scarsdale, New York, I moved to Miami, Florida, to start a masterís program in marine affairs. While the program was slowed down first by Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and then a lengthy internship at the Smithsonian Institution in 1994, I returned to RSMAS in 1995 to work as a teaching assistant and then as a research associate in 1995. I have worked at RSMAS since then, between 1995-99 as a research associate at the Division of Marine Affairs and Policy, and since 1999 as a senior research associate at the Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries and coordinator for the Center for Independent Experts (CIE).

Manoj Shivlani
Marine Biology and Fisheries
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida, 33149
Phone: (305) 421-
E-mail: mshivlani@rsmas.miami.edu

Monica Valle Mónica Valle

I am originally from Mexico City, where I grew up and lived most of my life. After doing my thesis research at the Institute of Marine Science and Limnology, UNAM in the Mexican Caribbean, I obtained a bachelorís degree in Biology from the UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autůnoma de Mexico). I worked for two years at the Ministry of Ecology and Environment, and then obtained a Fulbright fellowship to pursue a doctoral degree in the U.S. In 2003 I obtained a Ph.D. in Marine Biology and Fisheries from RSMAS. I have worked as a Postdoctoral researcher at the same institution since 2004, collaborating closely with the Southeast Fishery Science Center and the Caribbean Fisheries Management Council of the National Marine Fisheries Service, on stock assessment of various Caribbean fish and shellfish species, on the ecology of mangrove fishes, and on simulation modeling for fisheries management.

Mónica Valle-Esquivel, Ph.D.
University of Miami
Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, FL 33149
Phone: (305) 421-4831
Fax: (305) 361-4457
E-mail: mvalle@rsmas.miami.edu

John Walter John Walter

I was born in Maryland and grew up on the shores of Chesapeake Bay where I cultivated an enduring desire to find out how and what creatures made a living in its turbid waters. This and a slight passion for soccer led me to a biology degree at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, VA. After college I worked briefly as an environmental chemist and then started a MS degree at the College of William and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS). Several years later I emerged with an MS, 26 credits of coursework towards an MS in statistics at Old Dominion University, a USCG captain license and a PhD in fisheries science. Along the way I fed my desire to understand the aquatic environment by fishing, trawling, seining or exploring almost the entirety of Chesapeake Bay. At the same time I realized that successful management and ultimately conservation of natural resources required equally ecological and biological insight as well as quantitative and statistical skills for assessing and modeling resource status. While my research in quantitative assessment of fisheries and, specifically, incorporating aspects of space into data collection and assessment focuses on the latter, I seek to never lose sight of the former. Seeking clearer, rather than greener, waters to explore, I am currently working as a post-doctoral researcher with CUFER where I am learning the marine ecosystems of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida and continuing research into using spatial methods to improve fisheries assessments. I also work with the NMFS Southeast Fisheries Science Center on several grouper stock assessments.

John F. Walter III, Ph.D.
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, Florida 33149
Phone: (305) 365-4114
Fax: (305) 365-4104
Cell: (804) 815-0881
E-mail: john.f.walter@noaa.gov




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